International Dining 2011

With the countless cultures represented on Long Island, there are countless opportunities for trying new things—not to mention exploring the depths of the classics.

Rangmahal

“You should only serve what you would eat yourself,” is the mantra owner-chef Arun Verma and his wife Kusum have adhered to during their seventeen years at this unassuming glass-plated storefront—and they mean it.
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Gemelli Ristorante

Owned and operated by Giorgio and Patricia Cosentino, progeny of the immigrant elders who have held forth at the food market and Italian epicure under the Gemelli name in the village since 1988, the restaurant is true to the family legacy and the cultural influences they picked up while living in “the old country.”
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Le Soir

Leave the casual “bistro style” eateries for lunch, brunch or quick early evening bites. Le Soir is for the night (as the name suggests), meaning it’s an authentic setting for your next dinner rendezvous.
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Café Havana

Three short years ago, Puerto Rican born Jose Maldonado Jr. paired up with Chef Ramon Perez, who hails from Cuba originally. The result is an eatery offering cuisine that is solid, well-textured country fare.
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Churrasquiera Bairrada

Welcome to the real deal, packed wall to wall with all walks of life Portuguese restaurant.
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Nisen

Welcome to the place where eclectic is an understatement. Nisen may look like a typical (or not so typical) high-end sushi place, but it is much more.
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The Living Room c/o The Maidstone

Admit it, you’ve never eaten Swedish. Those meatballs you thought were different? They weren’t even close to Scandinavian, were they? This is your chance to redeem yourself and finally taste the cuisine you’ve inadvertently been ignoring.
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