9 in art

to work as an artist is a lonely, sometimes downright lowly, enterprise. it is to be a rebel. it is to risk health insurance and an office phone and all the safety net of the square world (read: trappings). but artists can’t help themselves, can they? they plunge head-in, thinking of nothing else but the thing that’s pushing them, body and soul, to render their works. and it’s a good thing, because need them we do. if it weren’t for artists, who would interpret the world for us? journalists? ¶ thankfully, they need to be just as they are, too. ¶ this is the long division of 9 long island artists who share an intense love of art history (are downright haunted by it) and are acutely aware of their notches in its timeline. sometimes they are a little backwards. sometimes they are ambitious. but always, they are meditating on the impact of their work…just not when they’re in the zone of actually rendering it. ¶ sometimes an artist is important as much for what is not in his work at a given moment as for what is: whether or not the work is an actual refraction of what’s on his mind, it is a byproduct of his conscientiousness. ¶ when an artist is morally aware of social and political issues, it may come and go from his art in a literal way. and when it’s not visually present, it continues to inform his hand and still be a part of his pursuits. ¶ ultimately, the life is too an oeuvre as a work is to a day or a moment, making this pursuit—identifying 9 very important long island artists in 2013—a fool’s errand. but much good has come from humble places…

*editor’s note: 9 in art is the continuation of pulse’s annual Artist VIP List. This year is the first of the list rebranded. We changed the name for a few reasons, including that we know you like lists of things that are numbered.

sydney albertini

the funny thing about albertini shrugging off the explanation that her work is the perfect marriage—french intellectualism and whimsical american beauty—is part of the sense of humor this artist has about her work. and the sense of humor you get to enjoy as a result of it.
Read Full Article

colin goldberg

to define an artist by the tools he uses would be an oversimplification, no matter how huge a part of his renderings those tools are. goldberg thinks about our connection to computers and “as an artist it’d be foolish to not include that in my work.” but it’s not computer art.
Read Full Article

max moran

“art has a purpose. art is a thread.” moran refers to the first man who poked at cave walls to make a connection to the future for us. “artists are trying to scratch the surface of many things, on a small surface or plane, and get the most important thing: a response. if a painting doesn’t get a response, it’s failed.”
Read Full Article

doug reina

doug reina makes nice paintings. but, you know, it’s the nice ones you gotta watch out for. at first glance, you might see something familiar, common even. but then you keep looking and you realize there’s a lot more to it.
Read Full Article

matt satz

when an artist has resolved himself to participating in a conversation that goes well beyond what is rendered on a canvas, you can expect his contribution to likewise be no laughing matter. his goal is elemental painting. smoke painting, strand pieces and stick painting all wind up being very different vessels all going to and from the same place: “to push painting.”
Read Full Article

anne seelbach

her style is closer to abstract expressionism though it’s derivative of representational painting. it starts with a stroke of color to break the white space “so you’ve started something. everything after that is responding to it…what are you going to do next to get to the feeling you had in the beginning? using this way of painting to get to the idea of something.”
Read Full Article

louise p. sloane

sloane believes “nobody makes art from nothing. it’s all referential…[still] i don’t know what the point is of making something that’s already there…i’m not making fluxist art.” and actually, yes, these works are about permanence.
Read Full Article

kevin teare

kevin teare is looking to put something good into the world. something new. not because it is the noble thing to do, but because, “why waste your time doing anything else?”
Read Full Article

richard vaux

amidst the extensive plane of vaux’s imagination, the panels also have a deliberate geometry to them. they’re architectural. it happened for vaux because of the way you might look through a window and also see the reflection of what’s inside upon it.
Read Full Article

nada marjanovich

nada marjanovich

Nada Marjanovich is Publisher and Editor of Long Island Pulse Magazine. Prior to founding the title in 2005, she worked extensively in the internet. She's been writing since childhood and has been published for both fiction and poetry.