5 Things to Eat at Perennial Restaurant

After about a year of renovations, farm-to-table restaurant Perennial finally opened its doors in Garden City in January. The 68-seat minimalist restaurant features a small, creative and changing menu thought up by owner and chef Peter Mistretta. Mistretta, formerly of Manhattan’s praised farm-to-table restaurant Back Forty, gave me the scoop on five dishes he encourages diners to dig into.

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Roasted Carrots

Roasted Carrots

image: perennial restaurant

Perfect for vegetable lovers, this dish features heirloom carrots from Norwich Meadows Farm in the Hudson Valley. Cooked in the oven, the unpeeled carrots are served with radishes, carrot puree and toasted almonds. “We just give the carrots a good rinse,” said Mistretta. “We like to keep the skins on because it adds a lot of flavor and happens to be very nutritious.”

Pan Roasted Chicken

Chicken

image: perennial restaurant

This already popular dish needs a few days to be prepared. “It goes into a brine for 48 hours,” said Mistretta. When the order comes in, it’s cooked in a frying pan making the skin really crispy. It’s served with celery root, swiss chard and chicken jus.

Fusilli

Fusilli

image: perennial restaurant

This vegetarian pasta is made with squash puree, the basis for the sauce. It’s topped with brown butter, baby kale and grated cheese. “We try incorporate as many vegetarian options as we can on the menu,” the chef added.

Lettuces

Salad

image: perennial restaurant

While making this salad, Mistretta makes sure to keep the leaves full to “get a variety of textures and flavors.” It’s made with different types of greens and dressed with a sherry vinaigrette, a sigit cheese from Bridgehampton’s Mecox Bay farm and crushed nuts.

Butcher’s Steak

Steak

image: perennial restaurant

Served with sunchokes from MarGene Farms in Mattituck, maitake mushrooms and choron sauce, this dish will satisfy meat lovers. “The steak itself is a rotating cut, depending on what we have at the moment,” Mistretta said. Currently diners will dig into tri-tip, which the chef called “a delicious, rich cut.” The meat is also finished with garlic, thyme and butter.

anna halkidis

anna halkidis

Anna Halkidis is a web editor at Long Island Pulse. Feel free to reach out at anna@lipulse.com or on Twitter @annahalkidis.